Follow Us On:

FacebookTwitter

Subscribe

Upcoming Events

No events
Deer break element

Apprentice License Gives Beginners a Chance to Experience Hunting

                        

If you care about the future of hunting, introduce hunting to someone you care about. It’s now easier than ever to get a new hunter into the field for the first time with NDOW’s Apprentice License.  In the past, if you wanted to take a new person hunting for the first time, they were required to take an eight hour hunter education course and purchase a hunting license.

The Apprentice Hunter License, introduced in 2011, allows anyone 12 and older to hunt upland game and waterfowl (no tagged species) for one season without first completing a Hunter Education Course. The apprentice must have never previously held a hunting license and must always be accompanied and closely supervised by a mentor 18 or older who holds a valid Nevada hunting license and is willing to assume legal responsibility for the apprentice hunter.

NDOW encourages you to be that mentor. Help get a new hunter as passionate about the sport as you are.

The Apprentice License is free, but with mandatory habitat conservation and license agent fees ($4) and applicable stamps (state upland and /or state and federal duck); the cost will be $14 for upland game, $29 for waterfowl or $39 for both. The new Apprentice License is currently only available at NDOW regional offices statewide, but will be offered online in the future. For more information call (775) 688-1553 or go to www.ndow.org.

Deer break element
Connect with Us                         NDOW Facebook                         NDOW Twitter                         NDOW Google Plus                         NDOW YouTube                         NDOW.org                         Connecct with Us

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.

Deer break element

Fall Hunting Approaches, Sportsmen Reminded to Report Wildlife Crime to OGT

With the approach of the fall hunting season, game wardens from NDOW remind hunters to be alert for poaching and other wildlife crime. Sportsmen are asked to report wildlife crime to Nevada’s Operation Game Thief program at (800) 992-3030.

"Sportsmen in the field are the first witnesses to wildlife crime," said Rob Buonamici, chief game warden with NDOW.  "They are also the best defense we have against illegal taking of Nevada’s wildlife.  Sportsmen are a great resource for protecting wildlife resources."

Very often poachers will masquerade as hunters during the very busy hunting season.  These wildlife criminals use confusion in the field to illegally harvest wildlife.  The success of Operation Game Thief (OGT) hinges on the involvement of concerned sportsmen and women across the state.  The crimes detected, prosecuted and even prevented are all due to the ethical hunters and fishermen in Nevada as much as the game wardens who investigate the crimes.

Sportsmen interested in participating in the OGT program can contact the Department of Wildlife at (775) 688 - 1500.  To report suspected wildlife crimes, call OGT at 1-800-992-3030.  Anonymity is guaranteed, and rewards are paid upon the successful prosecution of wildlife crimes.  Protecting Nevada’s wildlife is everyone’s job.

More Information on Game Wardens

A lot of sportsmen may not understand the role game wardens play in protecting wildlife.  NDOW’s division of law enforcement recently completed a video to give some highlights.

Deer break element
Connect with Us                         NDOW Facebook                         NDOW Twitter                         NDOW Google Plus                         NDOW YouTube                         NDOW.org                         Connecct with Us

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.                        

NDOW Investigates Health Concerns in Bighorn Sheep
 

The Nevada Department of Wildlife is worried about the health of desert bighorn sheep living in the River Mountains between the city of Henderson and Lake Mead. Though biologists do not yet know exactly what is occurring within that herd, they are concerned that some animals may have contracted pneumonia, a disease that has serious and possibly deadly implications for bighorn sheep.

                Biologists have observed sheep exhibiting such troubling symptoms as coughing and nasal discharge. Members of the public have reported similar observations; however, these symptoms alone are not enough to make a reliable diagnosis. They also are indicative of other less threatening illnesses.

                “A runny nose is one thing, but pneumonia is another,” said Dr. Peregrine Wolff, State Wildlife Veterinarian. “The only sure way to make a firm diagnosis is to test samples from all tissues while testing for all pathogens, especially those that we know have caused pneumonia. Unfortunately, taking samples with cotton swabs or through blood samples is not enough. This situation requires that we complete a full necropsy on at least one sick adult and perhaps a couple that are young of the year.”  

                A necropsy is an autopsy that is performed on animals; therefore, NDOW biologists will need to euthanize one or more animals in order to complete the testing process.

                Additional factors fueling biologists’ concerns are the discoveries of sheep carcasses in the River Mountain that have tested positive for the bacteria Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae. Research has shown that Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae along with Pasteurella bacteria is strongly associated with pneumonia outbreaks in populations of free-ranging bighorn sheep throughout the western United States. “An in-depth study of a few sheep is important to help us understand a disease process that could potentially impact a sheep herd that is important to all of Nevada,” said Wolff.

                The River Mountain bighorn sheep herd has played a central role in the recovery of bighorn sheep statewide. When NDOW started its trapping and transplant program in 1967, there were less than 3,000 bighorn sheep statewide. Today that number is more than 11,000 animals. The herd also is an important economic and cultural resource for people of Boulder City.

              Since much of the River Mountain Range lies within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NDOW will coordinate its sampling efforts with biologists from the National Park Service.   

                The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.

 

Contact:           Douglas Nielsen           

 

Phone:             (702) 486-5127 x 3500

Email:              This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Date:               9/2/2013

NEWS 4 http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/Court-fails-to-send-names-of-mentally-ill-to/VlWFYZXplkOMedRZS_oxYg.cspx

WASHOE COUNTY, Nev. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- Washoe County District court Administrator Joey Orduna-Hastings has confirmed that, according to a Washoe District Court audit, the court failed to send the names of 179 mentally ill people in northern Nevada to the database that would prohibit them from possessing firearms.
The audit was triggered when the court learned a man who bought a gun from a Reno police officer was mentally ill, but not in the database.
According to Hastings, the problem is because of a glitch in the system and they say they are addressing that problem.

Deer break element

Nevada Big Game Tags Get a New Look

Nevada’s big game tags have a new look for 2013 and there are two important changes hunters need to be aware of before heading afield. Attached to each tag is a two-part transportation permit that no longer requires hunters to seek out a game warden or other state wildlife official in order to make the necessary legal arrangements to transport harvested big game. Another addition is a signature line that must be completed before hunting. Without the tag holder’s signature, the tag is invalid.  

A transportation permit is required when someone other than the legal tag holder is going to transport a big game animal harvested by the tag holder. For instance, if the tag holder chooses to stay behind to hunt birds, he can have a friend or family member transport his animal to a meat processor. "While not everyone will need a transportation permit, it will definitely make it much easier for a tag holder to follow state laws when having another person transport their legally harvested big game animal," said Doug Nielsen, Conservation Education supervisor for the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). "In past years the process was more complicated and could be time consuming."

To be legal, three people need be present to properly complete and witness the signing of the transportation permit, including the hunter, the transporter and a witness.  The witness must sign, date and document the time he or she witnessed the transfer of the animal.  The tag holder’s copy of the transportation permit must remain attached to the tag in order to be valid.

NDOW would like to remind hunters that transportation by a person other than the hunter for all other game harvest limits, such as upland game, fish and migratory birds has not changed.  Those hunters will still need to seek out a warden, license agent or other state wildlife official that have transportation permits in order to have another person legally transport their harvested game.  Locations of transportation permit vendors are listed in the back of the 2013 Nevada Hunting Guide.

Hunters will note that tags still come with a mandatory questionnaire and a taxidermy stub that is used when an animal is taken to a taxidermist. More information about the transportation permit and the proper use of big game tags can be found in the 2013 Nevada Hunting Guide.                        

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.                        

Deer break element
Connect with Us                         NDOW Facebook                         NDOW Twitter                         NDOW Google Plus                         NDOW YouTube                         NDOW.org                         Connecct with Us

The Nevada Department of Wildlife protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting and boating safety.

NDOW's wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen's license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear.

Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing or combination license.

Duck Numbers Remain Strong this Year
    Despite slight declines, most species remain well above long-term averages
View speciesbreakdown, charts and info. The US Fish and Wildlife Service today released its report on 2013 Trends in Duck Breeding Populations, based on surveys conducted in May and early June. Total populations were estimated at 45.6 million breeding ducks in the surveyed area. This estimate represents a 6-percent decrease from last year's estimate of 48.6 million birds, and is 33 percent above the 1955-2012 long-term average.
Of the 10 species surveyed, 7 were similar to last year's estimates, including mallards. Scaup and blue-winged teal were significantly below last year's estimates. Wigeon were 23 percent above last year. Mallards, similar in number to 2012, are 36 percent above the long-term average. Two species (northern pintail and scaup) remained below their long-term average and North American Waterfowl Management Plan goals.
View all the data and get a species-by-species breakdown at www.ducks.org/2013ducknumbers.
 

Press Release from the Nevada Firearms Coalition:

LAS VEGAS – The Nevada Firearms Coalition welcomes the United States Conference of Mayors to Las Vegas for their Annual Meeting and calls on Nevada mayors to be innovative in their discussions about safe communities and quit over-regulating the 2nd Amendment.“Nevadans just said loud and clear that they opposed Bloomberg’s overreaching gun legislation, now mayors from across the country are coming to Las Vegas to discuss new strategies to over-regulate the 2nd Amendment when they really need to be talking about proven practices to reduce firearms accidents,” said Don Turner, President of the Nevada Firearms Coalition.

NDOW To Conduct Statewide Boating Under the Influence Enforcement       

Agency Participates in Nationwide Effort Following Local, High Profile Incidents

            Game wardens with the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) will be targeting boaters operating under the influence (OUI) this weekend in waters across Nevada as part of a nationally coordinated enforcement effort dubbed “Operation Dry Water.” As part of the effort, NDOW will be moving extra officers from other parts of the state to focus on busy recreational waters, such as Lakes Mead and Mohave. “We want to move our officers to the trouble spots,” said Pfiffner. “We know where people are operating under the influence and we will be saturating those areas."

Attachments:
Download this file (062513_Dry_Water.pdf)062513_Dry_Water.pdf88 Kb

Dove Hunt Applications Due for Overton WMA

            Hunters who plan to spend opening day and the first weekend of the 2013 mourning dove season hunting at the Overton Wildlife Management Area (OWMA) have until July 10 to submit their reservation applications. Applications must be received at the Nevada Department of Wildlife(NDOW) Headquarters Office in Reno no later than 5 p.m., July 10, and must be delivered only through a postal service. Please see the attachment for further information.

Attachments:
Download this file (062513_OWMA_dove_hunt.pdf)062513_OWMA_dove_hunt.pdf81 Kb

 

 

Ask a Nevada sportsman about gun control and you might get a myriad of answers, but
first you might get some questions. Are you talking about hurrying up a steep
hill only to get to the top with an accelerated heart rate and you want to know
how to control the gun for a well placed shot? 
Other questions might be how do you control your gun when a covey of
quail flushes from your feet? But the biggest question of all is the gun
control being promoted by the legislature. Oh, THAT gun control!!

 

Click on the pdf attachment to continue reading....

The Governor's office has set up a telephone voting process for SB221 so you can call in and indicate your vote by pressing #2 to vote AGAINST SB 221.

 

 

Call (775)684-5670 and then press 2 to vote AGAINST the measure.