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http://wn.ktvu.com/story/27713316/fremont-police-kill-rampaging-sick-coyote#.VKBG6pkDINQ.mailto

 

FREMONT (KTVU and Wires) -- On Christmas afternoon, Fremont police received several calls about coyote attacks.

The first call came in at 5:41 p.m. about a 42-year-old man who was walking to his car parked in front of a home in the 3100 block of Starr Street when a coyote bit his leg, according to police.

The man apparently ran with his children toward a house and the coyote followed the group. Everyone was able to get inside before the coyote followed, police said.

The man was then driven to a hospital to treat the bite.

Officers responded to the area, but could not find the animal.

Then at 6:28 p.m. a second call came in from a man who said he was running near his home on Montevideo Circle when he thought a wolf was chasing him. The man apparently kicked the animal off him and safely returned home.

Officers responded to the area, which was near where the first attack occurred, and looked for the animal.

During the search a third call came about a boy who had been bitten around 5:30 p.m. while walking on Via Oporto, about a block away. The boy's father had scared off the coyote, police said.

Officers eventually found the coyote on Nido Court, about a mile away, around 6:50 p.m. The animal looked sick and possibly injured, police said.

Officers killed the coyote and took its body to the Tri-City Animal Shelter in Fremont where animal service officers tested the animal for rabies and other diseases.

The victims attacked by the coyote were not seriously injured. All were treated and released from the hospital, police said.

Why won't Solera HOA put safety first in case of coyote killing family pet?

By Darcy Spears. CREATED Jan 5, 2015

 

 

Las Vegas, NV (KTNV) -- A valley woman found a simple solution to keep her pets safe after a coyote attack.

But her homeowners association appears to be taking the coyote's side.

Contact 13 Chief Investigator Darcy Spears asks why safety isn't coming first in this HOA Hall of Shame report.

Marie Hodge finds comfort in her furry friends, and Arne was a longtime favorite, "He was the most beautiful kitten I'd ever seen and the bonding was unreal that we had together."

But Arne's life was cut short this summer when a coyote jumped Marie's wall and attacked Arne in his own backyard.

"After Arne died, I just wanted a way to protect my cats."

She found coyote rollers. Video from the manufacturer shows how they keep animals from getting a grip on the top of a wall.

The rollers would be installed on top of Marie's side wall so they really would only be visible to her and the neighbor on the other side.

Neighbors on both sides of Marie's home approved the rollers, but the HOA did not.

They sent her a letter stating: "Coyote rollers are not consistent within the Solera at Stallion Mountain Design Guidelines."

After Contact 13 first told Arne's story in October, Marie appealed the HOA's decision.

"They said they would go over it and it was denied."

She got another letter saying walls and fences can't be more than six feet tall.

According to Doug Nielsen of the Nevada Division of Wildlife, that height "is merely a hurdle for an animal like a coyote or a bobcat."

Nielsen says the agency has tried to urge HOA's to be more flexible.

"We do have to ask the question, at what point in time do aesthetics trump someone's sense of personal safety or comfort in their neighborhood?"

He says golf course communities like Solera attract coyotes.

"They don't distinguish between a rabbit and a poodle. It's something on the move and it looks edible."

NDOW recommends rollers or wrought iron fencing to keep coyotes out, but they often hit a brick wall with HOA boards.

"We have to be willing to change some of the things we do if we want to minimize the potential to have a coyote enter somebody's backyard."

Marie says the coyote problem at Solera is getting worse. Pictures she took and emails from neighbors discuss how brazen the animals have become.

One woman walking her dogs encountered a coyote on the sidewalk, "And she was like yelling at it. Throwing rocks at it and it wouldn't leave," explained Marie.

Another neighbor spotted one running across her backyard wall, "So she went, whoo! And he jumped off the wall and into somebody else's yard."

A third resident was standing in her garage and, "A coyote walked by carrying a little dog in its mouth."

That's no surprise to State Senator Mark Manendo, who happens to be one of Marie's neighbors. He likes the coyote rollers and would welcome them at Solera.

"Help deter coyotes from jumping over the wall, getting your pet, maybe even your child, your young child," Sen. Manendo said.

He adds that HOAs need to adapt to change.

"Your home is your castle and safety should be the utmost important thing. I think there should be some reasonableness when you're talking about what you can and cannot do to your home."

Sen. Manendo recalled a big fight years ago when HOAs wouldn't allow homeowners to install rolling shutters, which help keep power bills down and help prevent break-ins.

That fight went all the way to Carson City where lawmakers sided with homeowners, changing the law to protect their rights.

Manendo says if HOAs continue to prevent residents from using common sense coyote solutions, lawmakers could step in again.

"I think you're going to see some debates in the near future about this particular issue, maybe even as soon as the next legislative session."

Marie says her neighbors are coming to the same conclusion. She's collected dozens of signatures showing support.

The Solera HOA board has refused multiple requests to speak with us on camera. But they will have to answer to the Real Estate Division Ombudsman where Marie's case is currently pending.

Sen. Manendo will also seek answers at a town hall meeting later this month.

Study Finds Feral Cats Likely Driving Disease Among Deer

 

By TWS Government Affairs

Posted on December 27, 2014

Image Credit: USFWS

Free-roaming domestic cats (Felis catus) are widely understood to have substantial negative impacts on wildlife. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists cats among the world’s worst non-native invasive species, and cats on islands worldwide have contributed to 33 species extinctions (Lowe et al. 2000, Medina et al. 2011). In the United States free-roaming cats are the top source of direct anthropogenic mortality to birds and mammals, killing approximately 2.4 billion birds and 12.3 billion mammals each year (Loss et al. 2013).

The indirect impacts of cats on wildlife are less obvious, but one of the greatest emerging threats from free-roaming cats is infection with Toxoplasma gondiiT. gondii is a parasitic protozoan that can infect all warm-blooded species but relies on felids to complete its life cycle. According to a new study published in EcoHealth, feral cats are likely driving white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) infections in northeastern Ohio (Ballash et al. 2014). Cats that host T. gondii excrete oocysts into the environment in their feces, and a single cat can deposit hundreds of millions of oocysts, which may remain infectious for up to 18 months (Tenter et al.2000).

The study’s authors collected white-tailed deer samples at the Cleveland Metroparks as part of a deer management program. Cat serum samples were collected from cats in a trap, neuter, release (TNR) program in the Greater Cleveland area. TNR programs spay/neuter feral cats and then release them into the environment. Nearly 60% of white-tailed deer and 52% of feral cats tested positive for T. gondii. Older deer and deer in urban environments were more likely to be infected, suggesting horizontal transmission from environmental exposure.

The study’s findings have implications for people as well. Widespread environmental contamination increases the likelihood of human infections. In people, infection has been linked to schizophrenia and can lead to miscarriages, blindness, memory loss, and death (Torrey and Yolken 2013, Gajewski et al. 2014). Due to the creation of tissue cysts in infected deer, people that consume undercooked venison can also acquire T. gondii and the subsequent disease, toxoplasmosis.

The Wildlife Society actively supports the humane removal of feral cats from native ecosystems. See our position statement and fact sheet for more information on how feral and free-ranging domestic cats impact wildlife.

This article was written in cooperation with the American Bird Conservancy.

Nevada Wildlife Board Restricts Antler Gathering

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/science/article/Nevada-wildlife-board-restricts-antler-gathering-5346120.php?cmpid=email-mobile

 

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada wildlife commissioners have approved a measure making it illegal to collect the felled antlers of deer and elk from early winter to spring.

The board unanimously adopted the rule designed to ease the stress on big game populations during the coldest months when they are most vulnerable to environmental conditions.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal (http://bit.ly/1pt1tc5 ) reports the action taken by the board Saturday in Reno prohibits "shed hunting" from Jan. 1 to April 15.

A proposal to require a Nevada hunting license to collect antlers, which are dropped by the animals every winter, was not approved by the board.

The seasonal ban on antler collection mirrors what other Western states are doing to reduce stress on the animals during the winter months.

Collecting antlers is a growing pastime that can be lucrative. Rob Buonamici, law enforcement division chief for the Nevada Department of Wildlife, said gathering shed antlers has grown in popularity in recent years, both for hobbyists and by commercial interests.

"This was something unheard of 20 years ago," Buonamici said.

But there has been growing awareness that shed antlers have value, Buonamici said.

"The price is somewhere around $9 to $12 a pound for elk antlers," he said. "If you find a matched set from a trophy bull elk, they could be worth from $500 to thousands of dollars."

The antlers are used in a variety of ways, including as chandeliers, furniture or other decorative items.

Nevada's estimated 17,000 elk are found throughout much of the state. The state's 110,000 deer are likewise found throughout much of the state.

Most collectors have no intention of harming wildlife, but if they disrupt wintering populations of deer and elk they can do harm, Buonamici said.

There have also been extreme incidents where a collector sees an Elk with a trophy set of antlers still partially attached and uses an all-terrain vehicle to push the animal through trees or brush to get them to fall off.

Collectors can also damage habitat by using ATVs to search for the antlers.

Because other states have regulated the practice and Nevada has not, collectors come to the state during the winter to search for antlers, he said.

"We want people out enjoying the outdoors, but we also want to protect our wildlife resources," Buonamici said.

Elko resident Chris Jasmine, who has been a shed hunter for many years, said he does not oppose regulations that seek to reduce the stress on wildlife during the critical winter months by restricting the activity.

But with any new law or rule, it is all about the enforcement, he said.

Jasmine, who sells antlers, uses them for decoration and in his small woodworking business. He said otherwise law-abiding people will be penalized for following the rules while others will ignore them.

Please click the link for full story and video.

http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/Report-Bear-activists-threaten-to-kill-Tahoe/lME6iRwSIUm0chNKGbp0Ng.cspx?rss=3353

 INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. (AP) — A Lake Tahoe couple filed a police report saying they received numerous death threats and harassing messages after reporting problems with a black bear that was captured and euthanized by Nevada wildlife officials. Richard and Adrienne Evans of Incline Village filed the report with the Washoe County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, the same day the bear was killed. The couple says phone threats started coming Wednesday night to their home and Richard Evans' construction office after wildlife officials installed a trap outside their home. The two say the bear had attempted to break into Adrienne Evans' car twice in recent weeks and succeeded Tuesday night, causing extensive damage to its interior. She denied having food inside as alleged by critics. Nevada Department of Wildlife spokesman Chris Healy says the 263-pound black bear was euthanized because it posed a threat to public safety. He says the animal was captured and released back into the wild earlier this year.

Ann Bryant of the Bear League says members of her citizens group are urged not to break any laws, but "emotions are going to be high as long" as bears are being killed.

Take a moment and watch! This is a great 22 minute video debating the hunting issue. It shows the arguments that anti-hunting groups make, and it shows how hunting has survived the test of time. This is also a good video to have your kids watch and spread the word. This video was made by the National Sports Shooting Foundation which is the same group that brings the SHOT show to Vegas.

 

http://www.nssf.org/education/WhatTheySayAboutHunting.cfm

 

 

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Apprentice License Gives Beginners a Chance to Experience Hunting

                        

If you care about the future of hunting, introduce hunting to someone you care about. It’s now easier than ever to get a new hunter into the field for the first time with NDOW’s Apprentice License.  In the past, if you wanted to take a new person hunting for the first time, they were required to take an eight hour hunter education course and purchase a hunting license.

The Apprentice Hunter License, introduced in 2011, allows anyone 12 and older to hunt upland game and waterfowl (no tagged species) for one season without first completing a Hunter Education Course. The apprentice must have never previously held a hunting license and must always be accompanied and closely supervised by a mentor 18 or older who holds a valid Nevada hunting license and is willing to assume legal responsibility for the apprentice hunter.

NDOW encourages you to be that mentor. Help get a new hunter as passionate about the sport as you are.

The Apprentice License is free, but with mandatory habitat conservation and license agent fees ($4) and applicable stamps (state upland and /or state and federal duck); the cost will be $14 for upland game, $29 for waterfowl or $39 for both. The new Apprentice License is currently only available at NDOW regional offices statewide, but will be offered online in the future. For more information call (775) 688-1553 or go to www.ndow.org.

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The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.

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Fall Hunting Approaches, Sportsmen Reminded to Report Wildlife Crime to OGT

With the approach of the fall hunting season, game wardens from NDOW remind hunters to be alert for poaching and other wildlife crime. Sportsmen are asked to report wildlife crime to Nevada’s Operation Game Thief program at (800) 992-3030.

"Sportsmen in the field are the first witnesses to wildlife crime," said Rob Buonamici, chief game warden with NDOW.  "They are also the best defense we have against illegal taking of Nevada’s wildlife.  Sportsmen are a great resource for protecting wildlife resources."

Very often poachers will masquerade as hunters during the very busy hunting season.  These wildlife criminals use confusion in the field to illegally harvest wildlife.  The success of Operation Game Thief (OGT) hinges on the involvement of concerned sportsmen and women across the state.  The crimes detected, prosecuted and even prevented are all due to the ethical hunters and fishermen in Nevada as much as the game wardens who investigate the crimes.

Sportsmen interested in participating in the OGT program can contact the Department of Wildlife at (775) 688 - 1500.  To report suspected wildlife crimes, call OGT at 1-800-992-3030.  Anonymity is guaranteed, and rewards are paid upon the successful prosecution of wildlife crimes.  Protecting Nevada’s wildlife is everyone’s job.

More Information on Game Wardens

A lot of sportsmen may not understand the role game wardens play in protecting wildlife.  NDOW’s division of law enforcement recently completed a video to give some highlights.

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Connect with Us                         NDOW Facebook                         NDOW Twitter                         NDOW Google Plus                         NDOW YouTube                         NDOW.org                         Connecct with Us

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.                        

NDOW Investigates Health Concerns in Bighorn Sheep
 

The Nevada Department of Wildlife is worried about the health of desert bighorn sheep living in the River Mountains between the city of Henderson and Lake Mead. Though biologists do not yet know exactly what is occurring within that herd, they are concerned that some animals may have contracted pneumonia, a disease that has serious and possibly deadly implications for bighorn sheep.

                Biologists have observed sheep exhibiting such troubling symptoms as coughing and nasal discharge. Members of the public have reported similar observations; however, these symptoms alone are not enough to make a reliable diagnosis. They also are indicative of other less threatening illnesses.

                “A runny nose is one thing, but pneumonia is another,” said Dr. Peregrine Wolff, State Wildlife Veterinarian. “The only sure way to make a firm diagnosis is to test samples from all tissues while testing for all pathogens, especially those that we know have caused pneumonia. Unfortunately, taking samples with cotton swabs or through blood samples is not enough. This situation requires that we complete a full necropsy on at least one sick adult and perhaps a couple that are young of the year.”  

                A necropsy is an autopsy that is performed on animals; therefore, NDOW biologists will need to euthanize one or more animals in order to complete the testing process.

                Additional factors fueling biologists’ concerns are the discoveries of sheep carcasses in the River Mountain that have tested positive for the bacteria Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae. Research has shown that Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae along with Pasteurella bacteria is strongly associated with pneumonia outbreaks in populations of free-ranging bighorn sheep throughout the western United States. “An in-depth study of a few sheep is important to help us understand a disease process that could potentially impact a sheep herd that is important to all of Nevada,” said Wolff.

                The River Mountain bighorn sheep herd has played a central role in the recovery of bighorn sheep statewide. When NDOW started its trapping and transplant program in 1967, there were less than 3,000 bighorn sheep statewide. Today that number is more than 11,000 animals. The herd also is an important economic and cultural resource for people of Boulder City.

              Since much of the River Mountain Range lies within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NDOW will coordinate its sampling efforts with biologists from the National Park Service.   

                The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.

 

Contact:           Douglas Nielsen           

 

Phone:             (702) 486-5127 x 3500

Email:              This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Date:               9/2/2013

NEWS 4 http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/Court-fails-to-send-names-of-mentally-ill-to/VlWFYZXplkOMedRZS_oxYg.cspx

WASHOE COUNTY, Nev. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- Washoe County District court Administrator Joey Orduna-Hastings has confirmed that, according to a Washoe District Court audit, the court failed to send the names of 179 mentally ill people in northern Nevada to the database that would prohibit them from possessing firearms.
The audit was triggered when the court learned a man who bought a gun from a Reno police officer was mentally ill, but not in the database.
According to Hastings, the problem is because of a glitch in the system and they say they are addressing that problem.

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Nevada Big Game Tags Get a New Look

Nevada’s big game tags have a new look for 2013 and there are two important changes hunters need to be aware of before heading afield. Attached to each tag is a two-part transportation permit that no longer requires hunters to seek out a game warden or other state wildlife official in order to make the necessary legal arrangements to transport harvested big game. Another addition is a signature line that must be completed before hunting. Without the tag holder’s signature, the tag is invalid.  

A transportation permit is required when someone other than the legal tag holder is going to transport a big game animal harvested by the tag holder. For instance, if the tag holder chooses to stay behind to hunt birds, he can have a friend or family member transport his animal to a meat processor. "While not everyone will need a transportation permit, it will definitely make it much easier for a tag holder to follow state laws when having another person transport their legally harvested big game animal," said Doug Nielsen, Conservation Education supervisor for the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). "In past years the process was more complicated and could be time consuming."

To be legal, three people need be present to properly complete and witness the signing of the transportation permit, including the hunter, the transporter and a witness.  The witness must sign, date and document the time he or she witnessed the transfer of the animal.  The tag holder’s copy of the transportation permit must remain attached to the tag in order to be valid.

NDOW would like to remind hunters that transportation by a person other than the hunter for all other game harvest limits, such as upland game, fish and migratory birds has not changed.  Those hunters will still need to seek out a warden, license agent or other state wildlife official that have transportation permits in order to have another person legally transport their harvested game.  Locations of transportation permit vendors are listed in the back of the 2013 Nevada Hunting Guide.

Hunters will note that tags still come with a mandatory questionnaire and a taxidermy stub that is used when an animal is taken to a taxidermist. More information about the transportation permit and the proper use of big game tags can be found in the 2013 Nevada Hunting Guide.                        

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting, and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen’s license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear. Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. Find us on Facebook, Twitter or visit us at www.ndow.org.                        

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Connect with Us                         NDOW Facebook                         NDOW Twitter                         NDOW Google Plus                         NDOW YouTube                         NDOW.org                         Connecct with Us

The Nevada Department of Wildlife protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, and promotes fishing, hunting and boating safety.

NDOW's wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by sportsmen's license and conservation fees and a federal surcharge on hunting and fishing gear.

Support wildlife and habitat conservation in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing or combination license.

Duck Numbers Remain Strong this Year
    Despite slight declines, most species remain well above long-term averages
View speciesbreakdown, charts and info. The US Fish and Wildlife Service today released its report on 2013 Trends in Duck Breeding Populations, based on surveys conducted in May and early June. Total populations were estimated at 45.6 million breeding ducks in the surveyed area. This estimate represents a 6-percent decrease from last year's estimate of 48.6 million birds, and is 33 percent above the 1955-2012 long-term average.
Of the 10 species surveyed, 7 were similar to last year's estimates, including mallards. Scaup and blue-winged teal were significantly below last year's estimates. Wigeon were 23 percent above last year. Mallards, similar in number to 2012, are 36 percent above the long-term average. Two species (northern pintail and scaup) remained below their long-term average and North American Waterfowl Management Plan goals.
View all the data and get a species-by-species breakdown at www.ducks.org/2013ducknumbers.